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Outdoors

  • Cooler weather will bring better fishing

    By Capt. Brylee

    Special to the Pioneer

    Sept. 21 marks the last day of summer. The cooler air and subtle weather changes will start to become more and more noticeable and with the hot summer we have had, they are much welcome.

     The Florida sun will start to entertain us less and less as autumn continues creating cooler waters and better fishing. 

    Both off-shore and in-shore production should increase as this happens.

  • Rough seas make off shore fishing difficult

    By Capt. Brylee

    Special to the Pioneer

    Afternoon thunderstorms and rough seas have made off shore fishing next to impossible these past few weeks.

    If you can find a day that weather is favorable long enough for an offshore trip, you will find the fish are out there. The question is–can you make it out there and back safely? 

    With the weather being as it is, inshore fishing will be easier to find times that will allow you to fish. Red fish and trout are hitting well on live shrimp, pin fish and jigs.

  • Pier Fishing

    By Capt. Brylee
    Special to the Pioneer

    Hurricane Isaac has ripped through the Gulf this past week and made fishing nearly impossible. Both the Atlantic and Gulf coasts have felt the impact of high winds and rains. Small boat advisories have plagued boaters’ news headlines as the seas have been rough.
    With many of the beaches closed and charter fishing for the most part non-existent, or at best not advised, many have tried their angling skills at the piers.

  • Backwater fishing is at its best

    By Capt. Brylee

    Special to the Pioneer

    The recent increase in rains have created a fresh water fisher’s haven. The rivers, lakes,and ponds have taken more water lately than in previous months. The Suwannee River has overflowed into most every spring through Levy County and the smaller rivers have done the same.

  • Snookered

     By Capt. Brylee
    Special to the Pioneer

    The weather has begun to give us our normal Florida summer weather. The rains each afternoon create the barometric pressure to rise and fall most of the day. This poses well for anglers both saltwater and fresh.
    While rising and falling barometric pressures increase fish productivity don’t forget to find the three musts to locating the fish; food, structure and comfort.

  • Scallops, sharks and drum

     By Capt. Brylee
    Special to the Pioneer

    As the waters continue to recover from Debby, scallops will start to become more prevalent.
     As in the weeks past many scallops are being taken in waters of seven feet or more; but as the waters clear more each week, they will move closer in.
    Remember to try and scallop on the incoming tides as they are more visible but if time doesn’t allow you to, dive deeper and look beneath the grass and in little hidden holes.

  • Debby’s not gone yet

    By Capt. Brylee

    Special to the Pioneer

    Although the aftermath of Tropical Storm Debby has not quite left the Gulf, and the hot summer days have made the fish and scallops stay in deeper waters; this may not be all bad. 

    For the fresh water angler the flooding of the rivers has created a lot of backwater areas where bait fish will retrieve to gain some of those bugs they are not normally privy to. 

  • Holy Scallops! You can keep the Gag

     By Capt. Brylee
    Special to the Pioneer

    July 1 Scallop and Gag Grouper seasons opened. The inshore waters are still feeling the wake of Tropical Storm Debby. leaving many of the bays stirred up and murky in places.
     Hagen’s Cove, between Steinhatchee and Keaton Beach is one such bay.
     Although the waters weren’t favorable close in shore many scallopers found success 400-500 yards off shore.

  • TS Debby slows fishing

    By Capt. Brylee
    Special to the Pioneer

    This past week or so, the Gulf has been filled with warm waters making the search for the keepers a little more difficult. From Steinhatchee to Cedar Key reports have been that the Red Snapper have been scattered.
    Capt. Steve Hart with Legal Limits Charters said his best luck had been around 48-50’ of water. Gag Grouper, which come into season on July 1 seem to go for live bait, so stick with the frozen to increase your chances to pull up Red Snapper and Red Grouper.

  • Chasing the trout

     By Capt. Brylee