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Features

  • By WINNELLE HORNE

    Special to the Pioneer

     The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, Sept. 30 at the Levy County Quilt Museum. We have had a busy week. We ended up taking the clothes to Cross City. There is a place there, next door to the Dixie County Advocate, that takes everything.

     We’re about to get everything put back where it belongs. We still have a small leak in the roof but when that is taken care of, we will finish up.

  • By IRENE GILREATH

    Special to the Pioneer 

    We held the first meeting of our new year on Sept. 8. President Eileen Nuce started the meeting by asking what we did during the summer. Two members had serious health problems; they were President Eileen and Carolyn Agazarm. It was good to know they are doing better now. Elsie Neal has continued to make a good recovery from knee replacement surgery. 

    Some of the members traveled during the summer. Delores Darpino returned from her trip with unusual souvenirs, two adorable kittens.

  • Workforce Connection’s new “Learn and Earn” program helps make hiring and training new employees affordable through subsidized on-the-job training and paid internships.

     The program kicks off Oct. 18 with an initial focus on professional and business services and law enforcement. Rolling enrollment continues through April 2011, targeting different industries or occupations each month. 

  • By Winnelle Horne

  •    George Munsell will tell you he  was born in Miami in 1939 then he’ll fast-forward to the time, 14 years later, when he would deliver papers on his bicycle then stop at the liquor store to get the coins he was paid with turned into bills.  
       One day the liquor storeowner told George’s dad, “I’m going to make that boy a jockey when he’s 16.”  His dad was fine with the idea.

  • On July 1-2, Williston School of Dance hosted its most prestigious workshop master class to date, as Michael Patrick Gallagher flew in for eight hours of master Irish dance instruction.

    Gallagher is a two-time World Champion Irish dancer as well as a longtime “Riverdance” lead.

    Gallagher hails from County Donegal, Ireland, and currently resides in Arizona. The school made his acquaintance several years ago when artistic director Sarah Ingley and her son used to travel to Gallagher’s workshops in Georgia.

  • Even though she is only 10 years old, Paige Rodriguez has already learned the meaning of compassion, sacrifice and commitment.

    The rising fifth grade student at Williston Elementary has chosen to devote part of her summer vacation to raising funds for cancer patients and cancer research by selling lemonade.

    Inspired by Alexandra “Alex” Scott, a Connecticut girl who had neuroblastoma, Paige opted to follow in her footsteps with an old-fashioned lemonade stand.

  • People often lament that they don’t know how they’ll cope with an extra mouth to feed. Imagine having 160 mouths to feed and every one of them dependent on you for every iota of food they eat.

    That’s the daunting task the volunteers at Feisty Acres face seven days a week, 52 weeks a year.

    Established in 1988 and incorporated in 1995, Feisty Acres is a cat rescue operation located between Williston and Bronson.

    Its founder, Edna Nute, lives on the property and oversees about a dozen volunteers who come to help with the kitty care.

  • Back in 1938 as the country was on the fringe of coming out of the Great Depression and right before terror would break out in the Second World War, little Anna Johnson watched with delight as her mother, Thersia, would make treats for the family of five girls from whatever fruit was available.

    Hot, sweltering days were spent in the Kentucky-mountain kitchen as she cooked jellies and jams from scratch.

  • She hadn’t participated in any type pageant until she was 20 years old, but when she heard the prizes included scholarships for college, Rachael Todd jumped feet first onto the runway.

    Two and a half years later, not only does she have scholarship money, she is the reigning Miss Florida.

    Saturday, Todd, 22, visited the Williston School of Dance to speak to the students about her reign and demonstrate the talent she exhibited in the Miss America pageant in February of this year.

  • All people from India are not snake charmers nor do they ride magic carpets or use elephants as their main form of transportation.

    That was the humorous finale of a presentation made Tuesday to Williston Rotary Club by the Group Study Exchange from Andrahra Pradesh, India.

    The five-member group, consisting of a dancer, a scientist, a tourism coordinator and two businessmen, is part of a Rotary exchange where Rotarians learn about other places and cultures.

  • Prayer is a two-way street between God and man and if you do all the talking, you may be missing out on what God is saying to you.

    That was the introduction last week by Judge Joseph Smith, as he delivered opening remarks to about 50 people gathered at Heritage Park to mark the National Day of Prayer.

    Smith told the assembly that when he gave his life to Christ more than three decades ago, he knew, “I can’t sing–or at least well. I can’t play an organ or piano.”

  • Editor’s note: To protect the privacy of those interviewed in the following story, only first names are used.

    For one hour every Wednesday afternoon, people flock to Nature Coast Regional Hospital where they check their woes and stresses at the door and set about for a body, mind and spirit transformation.

  • There’s nothing traditional about Beryl Bayer, although she’s the first to tell you she went to college for the most traditional of reasons–to find a husband.

    When that didn’t pan out as her parents expected, Bayer shrugged it off and continued a life full of creativity, service and change.

  • If you didn't grab your poodle skirt and cuff your jeans, you missed out on a treat Saturday night as the Lions Club hosted a 40s/50s dance with live music, lots of food and many memories.

  • For 100 days, Ruth Williams, 90, of Orange Lake called Williston Nursing Home and Rehab Center home. Miss Ruth was taken ill suddenly and unexpectedly and after a lengthy stint in the hospital needed some place to convalesce while she regained her strength. “I’m a Christian,” she said the day before she was going home, “and I’ve heard of miracles. I saw them here.” She praised the staff and said the residents were “one solid family” who come from diverse backgrounds.

  • Back in the ‘60s at the age of 16, Charles Millard painted his first car, a Pontiac Fire Chief . He recalls, “it was a nice clean job.” He painted the car aqua blue and says, “I’ve been a paint and body man ever since, both cars and motorcycles.”

  • Imagine, if you will, the land of rivers, lakes and springs long before Juan Ponce de León, Pedro Menéndez de Avilés and Hernando DeSoto explored the virgin wilderness we now call Florida.

    Imagine the vast wildness of the woods, the azure sky filled with cumulus clouds and the dense undergrowth of the swamps, filled with creatures, both great and small.

    That is what Gainesville nature photographer John Moran does every time he picks up his Canon camera and journeys into the exploration of his adopted homeland.

  • Joyce Smith is one of Williston Rehabilitation & Nursing Center’s repeat customers. “Yep,” says the 71-year-old soon-to-be-great-grandmother, “I was here in June of 2007 to get rehab after my knee replacement, then again last January for a few weeks to get strong after I had a pacemaker put in.”

  • It’s been a long road but Rocky Kuznik has finally arrived with the publication of his first novel The Never Pals. Kuznik signed copies for readers Saturday at the Victorian Tea Room, along with his wife Joydel. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, Kuznik has lived in Florida for years and lived in Morriston for a time before moving to Ocala. A self-proclaimed “short story guy” the novel is a witty tale of an odd couple and their relationship.