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Features

  • It is said that when people are married for a number of years they develop the ability to finish each other’s sentences–and sometimes thoughts.

  • Karon Johnson’s smile is the first thing that greets you when he enters a room and it never leaves his face, even when sharing the adversity that plagues his life.

    While he is an imposing figure of a man, his voice is soft much like his demeanor. However, it is that smile that speaks loudly and proudly of who he is. 

    Reared in Dunnellon,  Johnson graduated with honors in 1997 and set out to work in his chosen career of juvenile corrections.

  • I was born and reared in Kentucky, resided in Georgia for 17 years and now Florida for eight. There’s no question I am a Southern girl through and through.

    That fact has always been obvious, especially when I was with  family and friends who lived in the North. They laughed at my accent and marveled at the way we did things in the South.

  • People around the world are a little happier thanks to Rusty the Clown. 

  •  

    Donald Moore Jr. doesn’t remember a time when music wasn’t an integral part of his life.

    Born into a musical family that included his father and brother, it was only natural that like a moth to flame he would migrate to music.

    And for the last 40 plus years, he’s stayed there.

    Inspired by Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings and so many who are now considered classic artists, Moore picked up the 

       guitar in one hand and pen in the other and proceeded   

  • Story and Photo By Carolyn Ten Broeck

    Editor

    Donald Moore Jr. doesn’t remember a time when music wasn’t an integral part of his life.

    Born into a musical family that included his father and brother, it was only natural that like a moth to flame he would migrate to music.

    And for the last 40 plus years, he’s stayed there.

  • By Keith Stewart

    Special to the Pioneer

    Some of Morriston Baptist Church’s members recently went on mission to Lima and Cusco, Peru. 

    Working with Buckner International, Pastor Keith Stewart, his wife Margarette and three of his parishioners–Kelly and Vivian Culbertson, and Janet Colley–traveled more than 10 hours by car and air to minister in South America. 

    They spent eight days visiting various orphanages, youth and single mother homes throughout Lima and Cusco.

  • It was a feat that ends up on morning TV talk shows.
    Monday, an 8-year-old Jack Russell out on her afternoon bathroom break disappeared.
    “I’d seen a turtle the day before,” said the dog’s owner, Patty Hatch, “and thought she was following it.”
    Indeed she had.
    Penny, the curious Jack Russell, had wandered the way of the turtle and somehow became trapped in the turtle/gopher hole.

  • Ellas McDaniel Jr. was just a year old when his father went from relative obscurity, driving an asphalt truck and playing rhythm and blues on the street corners of Chicago, to worldwide fame.
    “He was trying to put diapers on me and my sister. That’s what led him to play on street corners,” McDaniel said last week from the home of Chiefland friend Duane Schwingel. “My mother (Ethel) worked for the Polo Meat Co., cuttin’ up chickens.”

  • While others are still trying to wake up, cook their breakfast and get their children dressed, Bo Dallas is already at the church with a song not only on his heart, but also his lips as he prepares for another day of worship.
    While that’s not too extraordinary for most people, what is unusual is that Dallas had prepared his own breakfast and gotten to Allen Chapel AME Church on his trusty scooter. That’s pretty good for someone who turned 105 years old Sept. 2.

  • Toni Collins isn’t shy about her beliefs, especially when it comes to history.

    “I’ve always been distressed that our young people are not learning about the history of this county,” she said Friday from the living room of her Chiefland home.

    Collins, who used to work for the county, was largely responsible for organizing the county’s historical archives and started the county’s historical board.

  • By ADA LANG

    news@cedarkeybeacon.com

    This week’s Conservation Corner suggests composting as another way to reduce the amount of trash you put into your garbage can and eventually, the landfill. 

  • Eleven months ago, Lisa Berrios was on medications for both diabetes and high blood pressure.
    Her weight had topped at 287 pounds, and as a nurse at the VA hospital in Gainesville, she knew something had to give soon.
    Because in addition to the physical complications that accompany obesity, the usually upbeat Lisa found herself combatting depression,
    “Let’s go to Zumba,” someone recommended.
    It was the beginning of a new life for her–one that is healthy and fun.

  • Nicole and Bruce Kosch had it all: a love that had blossomed since their high school days in Port Charlotte, good educations, great jobs, an adventure that took them to Wisconsin for a year and a warm, comfortable home in Morriston.

    The time was right to add to their number and so they began preparations to welcome a third into their fold.

    But after a year of unsuccessful attempts to conceive, the couple sought medical advice and testing.

    Bruce was up first, because male testing is less invasive.

  • The sights, sounds and smells of Christmas come alive this Sunday as the Williston Woman’s Club presents the Christmas Tour of Homes featuring four magnificent houses, their decor and their generous owners.
    A tradition that dates back almost 20 years has been resurrected by the club as a fund-raiser with monies earmarked for a covered pavilion at Williston Elementary School.

  • It was just a couple of hours into the New Year, 1945, when Ray Knisley, 86, of Chiefland, peeked out of a freezing foxhole after being awakened by the sound of gunshots.
    His unit, the 117th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mecz), had been dug in about 30 miles south of Strasbourg, Germany. There was snow on the ground, and in the light of a full moon he thought he saw a patrol coming in with German prisoners.  He hunkered back in to put on his boots and a jacket

  • By Donna Mitchell

  • Pet lovers enjoy photographing their friends and Williston veterinarian Bill Bennett, right, provides a showcase for their work. Most recent winners of Dr. Bennett’s contest are M.M. Lauderdale who photographed  his puppy and Leslie Redding who submitted a winning cat photo. Pictured with Dr. Bennett is Denise Young.

  • By Winnelle Horne

  • Story and photo by Donna Mitchell

       Linda Foster has blue eyes that twinkle and a ready, friendly smile.  She’s the sort of person who will chat if you want to chat and who won’t if you don’t.  It’s one of her ways of paying attention.