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NEWS

  • The next  Friends of the Williston Public Library Book Fair will be held Saturday, April 2 from 8:30 a.m. till 1:30 p.m. or as long as there are customers to be served. It will be located in the City Hall Community Center.
    Books are $1, hardbacks; 50 cents soft backs;  25 cents for paperbacks; $1 for tapes and videos;  10cents for magazines and children's books. As always monies collected are used for the benefit of helping keep the Williston Public Library the best in Levy County.

  • By Lou Elliott Jones and Carolyn Ten Broeck

    City Manager Marcus Collins has submitted his resignation and will be leaving in two weeks, according to City Councilman Brooks Holloway and Mayor Gerald Hethcoat.
    Holloway said last week that Collins is taking a $130,000 a year job with an engineering firm.
    “After what has happened here you cannot blame him for taking another job when they are throwing that kind of money at him,” Holloway said Friday.

  • For more than 15 years, Purina HOW® Horse Owner’s Workshops have been held across the nation to educate customers on the very latest in equine health and nutrition.
    This year, Midwest Feed & Farm and Canterbury Showplace, both of Newberry, will host the workshop and provide horse owners the opportunity to meet local equine specialists and learn about the newest developments in equine nutrition, health and maintenance care, veterinary issues, Purina research projects, training techniques and more.

  • The Williston Rotary Club will hold its annual Easter Egg Hunt for children up to 10 years old Saturday, April 9 at 11 a.m. at John Henry Celebration Park.

  • Things are winding down to the biggest party of the year in Williston–the annual Relay for Life.
    As the American Cancer Society’s principle fund-raiser, teams in and around Williston have been holding bake sales, raffles and dinners  for a year to raise money.
    On April 16 and April 17, the culmination of those efforts will be celebrated when the teams and their supporters gather at the track at Williston High School to rejoice in a job well done. For about 18 hours, revelry will abound with food, entertainment, games and more.

  • By Ada Lang

  • It went almost unnoticed at last week’s Levy County Commission meeting when Sheriff’s Maj. Evan Sullivan said the county budget is running a $732,358 deficit in the first three months of the year.
    Sullivan made the comment while announcing Sheriff Johnny Smith will not charge county and city agencies for dispatch services starting this fall as had been previously announced.
    “We know there’s an issue,” Sullivan said, referring to the money crunch.

  •  By Drollene Brown
    Special to the Pioneer

    Morriston resident Butch Mayes, author of The Ultimate Metal Detector Book: A Treasure Hunter’s Guide, will appear at the Friends of the Williston Public Library book fair Saturday, April 1. The monthly event is held at the Williston Community Center, next door to Williston City Hall (behind Walgreen's).

  • To judge by the comments after the Williston City Council interviewed three candidates for the City Attorney job Frederick J Koberlein Jr., son of a Dixie County judge, is the preferred choice for the position.
    The council interviewed three candidates on Thursday, March 24, and when they were done, some members were ready to vote on their choice among attorneys Koberlein of Lake City, Heather Christman of Winter Haven, and James T. “Ted” Schatt of Ocala.  

  • Betty Walker was the last to step on the bus leaving for Tallahassee. The faces of the passengers, clients of the Levy Association for Retarded Citizens, lit up when they saw her short frame come in to view.
    “Does anybody know why we’re going to Tallahassee?” Walker asked.
    “Yeah, for support!” replied a voice from the back. “We don’t want our services cut at all. We want funding.”

  • Unemployment in Levy County dropped to 11.4 percent in February, a figure not seen for at least two years.

  • Twenty-five years ago, many Floridians might have thought of coyotes as animals scratching out a living amid the arid landscapes of the Southwestern United States. After all, it was usually a desert mesa that Wily Coyote plummeted from in pursuit of the Roadrunner, not the top of a cabbage palm or granddaddy oak.
    But sometime in the late 1980s, biologists started documenting the movements of coyotes to the southeastern part of the country.

  • A homemakers group — with most members over age 55 — took the Levy County Commission to task for requiring they provide urine samples for drug tests in order to do volunteer work in the county’s libraries.

  • The Levy County Sheriff’s Office has decided not to charge local police and fire agencies for its dispatch services in the coming fiscal year as planned.
    Previously, Sheriff Johnny Smith had told municipal police and fire, and county fire and emergency medical services that their agencies would have to pay as much as $40,000 a year for dispatch services now provided free by his department. The charges were to start Oct. 1 and every agency would be required to purchase a $7,500 software program to become part of the sheriff’s silent dispatch system.

  • Chunky Pond, Levyville, Bronson–no matter what it was called, it was always the centerpiece of Levy County.
    That was but one of the hundreds of historical snippets shared Saturday as Levy County celebrated the 150th anniversary of the Atlantic to the Gulf Railroad that connected Fernadina Beach to Cedar Key.
    The brainchild of David Levy Yulee, Florida senator and the first Jewish member of Congress, the railroad began in 1856 and after several starts-stops, at last reached Cedar Key in 1861.

  • By Mike Wright
    Special to the Pioneer

    Every day thousands of vehicles crawl through downtown Crystal River as they head north or south.
    City officials are cringing at the thought of adding heavy rock trucks to that mix.
    A company’s proposal for a limestone mine just north of Inglis includes promises of up to 250 trucks per day heading south on U.S. 19 through Crystal River — and the same amount returning empty to the quarry.

  • While the pot holes may not be quite big enough to hide a vehicle, some city streets are in rough condition.
    Residents along those deteriorating thoroughfares got good news Tuesday night when Williston City Council learned of the 2011 asphalt repaving schedule.
    Portions, or all, of eight city streets will be resurfaced this year, City Manager Marcus Collins said.
    Slated for work are: NE 11th Street, SE 4th Lane, NW 1st Street, NE 1st Street, South Main Street, NW 4th Street, SE 4th Street and SE 10th Street.

  • A third man sought in a Feb. 1 home invasion in Williston has been arrested and jailed in Alachua County.
    Stefan Lernard Lattimore, 35, of Gainesville is being held under $20,000 bond in the Alachua County Jail on three counts of failure to appear in court as promised.
    He also has an outstanding arrest warrant from Levy County on armed home invasion robbery.