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NEWS

  • For the third time in 18 months the hospital in Williston is under new management, but this time it’s going to stick, says new owner and CEO Jerry Gillman.
    With 40 years under his belt in hospital administration, Gillman knew when he first considered buying the hospital he would have his work cut out for him.
    Never was anything more true, he said, because when he came on as a consultant in June, he discovered their were 10-12 serious AHCA (Agency for Health Care Administration) violations hanging over the 40-bed hospital.

  • Veterans will be honored at a series of events starting with Williston Elementary School Tuesday and culminating with the Levy County Veterans Day Parade in Chiefland Saturday.
    In Williston, the annual salute to the men and women of the armed forces is slated for Thursday, Nov. 11 at 6 p .m.
    Choose one, or choose all but if you like your freedom, thank a veteran.
    Tuesday, Nov. 9
    WES

  • Voter dissatisfaction has led to a tidal shift in Levy County politics as the Board of County Commissioners has two firsts: Republicans elected to the board and a majority of seats in Republican hands.
    Republicans Ryan Bell and Chad “Cracker” Johnson, both of Chiefland, defeated their Democrat incumbents.

  • More than 52 million people in this country are disabled–either emotionally, mentally or physically–and most can benefit from skilled companions to assist them.
    That’s where the Guardian Angels come in.
    The non-profit organization, located in Williston, trains German shepherd service dogs that are utilized across the country and owner/operator/trainer Carol Borden wants people to know that they, too, can help.

  • The choice of who will lead Levy County, the state of Florida and the U.S. Congress all comes down to one person on Tuesday: the voter.

    Balloting will take place in 14 polling locations among the county’s 20 precincts from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday in Levy County as voters across the nation go to the polls to cast their ballots in the mid-term elections.

    Early voting is underway at the Supervisor of Elections office at 421 S. Court St, Bronson from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. through Saturday.

  • The proposed Tri-County Hospital for Chiefland has won almost $52 million of the $70 million in economic stimulus bond money it requested from the state’s pool of federal Economic Recovery Zone Bonds approved by Congress in 2009.
    The Levy County Board of Commissioners was notified on Oct. 21 by the state Division of Bond Finance that it will receive $51.935 million of the bond money. And as more money comes into the bond pool ó returned by municipalities and county governments that cannot or are unable to use the money-more will flow to the hospital.

  • Improvements planned for County Road 316 between U.S. Highway 41/State Road 25 and U.S. Highway 27A/State Road 500 could mean fewer trucks in front of Williston High School and through the downtown business district.
    The Levy County Commission has approved a deal with the Florida Transportation Department for the widening and resurfacing of CR316 at its Oct.19 meeting for $1,600,002. The state Department of Transportation would pony up $800,001 for the project under the County Incentive Grant Program.

  • Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development agency, has asked Williston officials to be one of three sites that pitch their airport and industrial land as the perfect location for a new jet trainer assembly facility.

  • State Rep. Leonard Bembry was the recipient of a Florida Library Association award for his efforts to ensure, through the Legislature, that libraries stay funded in Florida. The award was presented last week at the Williston Public Library. Pictured, from left, Levy County Commissioners Lilly Rooks and Nancy Bell, Bembry, director for Levy County Public Library System Lisa Brasher and Michelle Traylor, Librarian.

       

  • Rhonda Virden 

    The annual Miss Williston Pageant saw the crowning of three contestants in three age groups to reign over the coming year.

    Allie Rowan was named Miss Williston, Savannah Smith was named 1st runner-up, LilyAnn Greenstein was 2nd runner-up and Kathryn Allen was 3rd runner-up and Miss Congeniality.

    Kaylee Ann Nicholson was named Junior Miss Williston, Meghan Alfaro was 1st runner-up, Sarah Smith was 2nd runner-up and Destiny Ryalls was 3rd runner-up.

  • An Atlanta-based water company has inquired about buying the county-operated Manatee Water System, which serves 64 households in the Chiefland area, and University Oaks water system which serves 125 households in the Bronson area.

    Assistant County Coordinator Dick Tummond mentioned the inquiry at Tuesday's regular Levy County Board of Commissioners meeting sparking a discussion of whether the county should sell and questions about how to handle a sale.

  • Levy County will be putting its dragline up for sale, preferring to use another piece of equipment to mine and load limestone from the Gulf Hammock Pit for road construction.

    The Board of Commissioners on Tuesday approved the sale at the request of Road Department Administrative Superintendent Bruce Greenlee. who said the dragline is no longer needed for the county’s limerock mining operation. “We can only mine to 30 feet and we need to get rid of this. There is a lot of demand for this equipment.”

  • School Board of Levy County member G. Frank Etheridge was honored during Tuesday’s meeting, with board members presenting him with a plaque honoring his 20 years of service.

    Tuesday’s meeting was Etheridge’s final meeting as a board member. He is retiring from the board at the end of his term. Etheridge, who represents Williston for the board, is also the president of Perkins State Bank in Williston.

  • We are accepting individually wrapped snacks and small gifts to send in care packages overseas to our soliders this holiday season.  (Please no homemade food items) Cut off date for collecting these items will be November 15, 2010.  For shipping reasons.

  • By Toni C. Collins
    Special to the Pioneer

        One of Cedar Key’s best kept secrets is about to be revealed.  For a number of years, this secret was kept under wraps by a hand-full of local historians who now feel this segment of Cedar Key’s maritime history should be shared with the world.

  •    Owen Chad Johnson announces his candidacy for Levy County Commission District 2.  Levy County has been his home since 1994, when he married Angela Quincey. They have four children Tyler, Quin, Bryden and Maddilyn.

  • By Toni C. Collins
    Special to the Pioneer

       It is no surprise that Levy ARC has faced some critical financial challenges lately.  However, Executive Director, Betty Walker is determined to find ways to match up available resources to create a win-win situation for all involved.  Her latest challenge coupled LARC with the Plum Creek Foundation and the Exceptional Student Educational Program of the Levy County School District.

  • By Dedee MacLeod
    Special to the Pioneer

       American Cancer Society is a nationwide organization dedicated to both eliminating cancer and diminishing the suffering which it causes.  The money raised through events, such as Relay for Life, is used to fund cancer research, create programs for health education, and provide advocacy and services for those currently fighting cancer.

  •    The 41st Annual Cedar Key Seafood Festival takes place this Saturday and Sunday from 9 a.m until 5 p.m. each day.
       This major event features well over 200 arts and crafts exhibits, and great local seafood in City Park.
       There will be live musical entertainment at several places around town during the days and nights, and a parade on Saturday morning.
       Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuges participates in  the celebration by commemorating  National Wildlife Refuge Week.  

  • Army Sgt. Karl A Campbell, 34, of Chiefland only had a short time left in Afghanistan before returning home on holiday leave to see his son Carl, 4, his wife and their children who were at Fort Campbell, Ky.

    He had already been told that when his tour in the combat zone ended he would be assigned to Special Forces training. It was an opportunity the man trained as a Ranger in his first Army stint lobbied hard to win.

    On Oct. 4 his dreams and service to this country ended in Babur Afghanistan.