• Levy County Commissioner  Marsha Drew, of Yankeetown, will not seek election in 2012 to the District 3 seat to which she was appointed in March 2009. 

    "I had been debating it at length for some time," she said on Monday after a special commission meeting. She had announced she would not seek election at an Oct. 18 meeting of the Inglis-Yankeetown Republican Club. "It wasn't any one thing."  

  • Lt. Sean Mullins said it was sometime in 2006 when, as a member of the Community Relations Division for the Levy County Sheriff’s Office, he was asked to come and speak to clients of the Levy Association of Retarded Citizens about matters of law, the types of things all people, as members of society, should be familiar with.

    “I had no idea what to expect,” Mullins said. “I gave a little speech, and they really appreciated it … I truly fell in love with them.”

  • Michael F. “Mike” Joyner has been appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to fill the District 1 Levy County Commission seat that has been vacant since Nov. 2, 2010.

    The seat was first vacated when then-Commissioner Tony Parker was indicted on federal bribery charges and suspended from office the day after his re-election on Nov. 4, 2008, by then-Gov. Charlie Crist.

    Joyner was an applicant for the open post at that time, but Crist appointed District 1 resident Chad “Cracker” Johnson in July 2009.

  • Whatever woes may be hanging over Williston’s Tri County Hospital hasn’t affected its open-for-business status.

    As of presstime Wednesday, the hospital is still up and running, despite rumors earlier this week that it was closing its doors.

    The misunderstanding began early Tuesday morning when a call went out over the emergency services radio band that the hospital was not accepting patients.

  • It took months of research, calculating and re-calculating, but three weeks after it was due to the state, the 2010 audit was delivered to Williston City Council.

    Helen Painter, auditor with Purvis Gray & Company, made her official presentation to the council, armed with the 2010 audit. Painter had met individually with council members and the mayor several weeks to discuss the audit and answer questions they might have, prior to the public presentation.

  • Levy County native and sheriff’s office major Evan Sullivan has recently filed paperwork with the Levy County Supervisor of Elections to seek election to the office of Levy County Sheriff.
     A lifelong and fourth generation law enforcement officer, Sullivan explained why he seeks elected office: “I was born and raised in Levy County, and my family has served our community for decades. It would be a great honor for me to serve my fellow citizens as sheriff,” said Sullivan.

  • It has been seven years since Otter Springs Assistant Fire Chief Victor B. Scott suffered a fatal heart attack at an Ocala truck stop while bringing home equipment used in a rigorous fire training exercise.
    He had not felt well at the end of the March 16, 2004, exercise. Because he died the next day, his death was not considered to be in the line of duty and his family was denied benefits.
    But one denial that hurt his family was that Scott would not be listed among those who died int he line of duty at the Florida and National Fallen Firefighters Memorials.

  • The next time you’re at a family reunion, ball game or church, take a look around you. Choose eight women and study their faces. They could be your sister, your mother, your daughter, your wife, your best friend–maybe in yourself.
    Then sit back and ponder the staggering fact that one of those women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime.
    Despite new strides in treatment-and even prevention-about 12.2 percent of all women will develop the disease. In 2011, more than 230,000 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed and 39,000 women will die.

  • Williston City Council voted last week to hire a lawyer skilled in labor day to conduct an investigation into the allegations made by City Clerk Nan Mack against Councilor Norm Fugate.
    Mack alleges that Fugate has created a hostile work environment that is affecting her job performance and causing personal health issues.
    In a letter to city council members dated Aug. 11, Mack asked for an investigation and relief from an “abusive situation.”

  • Citizens for an Educated Electorate will meet on the verandah of the Dunnellon Library from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15.
    The purpose is to show residents of Levy and Marion County how to contact their senators, congressional representatives and local media.
    This is not a political or partisan event. Everyone is welcome.

  • Williston residents will unite at a rally to officially launch their 11th annual Relay For Life season Monday, Oct. 10 from 5-8 p.m. at Williston’s Heritage Park Pavilion and they want the rest of Levy County to join in.
    The kickoff will be in the style of the Kentucky Derby, so grab your fancy hats and racing silks and join the fight against cancer.

  • For the third year in a row Levy County Sheriff Johnny Smith has found some extra cash in his budget at the close of the fiscal year — close to $250,000  — and bought six cars for $173,935.

  • Jamie Baker is praying that the stands at Williston’s Booster Stadium will be filled to capacity Friday night.
    He’s not alone.
    Jason Cason’s also praying.
    “I really believe that attendance at this event will rival the glory days of WHS football games back in the late ‘80s,” Cason said.  “Back then, the entire stadium was filled and fans filled both of the vacant areas at each end of the stadium.”

  • After a quick adjustment, and then another, on the piano bench, Amelia Erwin leaned forward to pore over a sheaf of music.
    “No, I don’t think I can play that one,” she said to the visitor, casting the pages aside and rifling through another stack.
    Hands poised over the keyboard, she struck a chord, picked up the music and proclaimed, “Not that one. I haven’t played in a while.”

  • When off-duty Marion County Deputy William Dietrich came to Williston Wednesday to buy farm supplies, he had no idea he would be the man who would foil a convenience store robbery.
    A little after 10 a.m. Wednesday, Dietrich tackled a suspect who took a charity jar of money from the Kangaroo Store on Noble Avenue, according to Williston Police Chief Dennis Strow.
    Michael Wayne Aurilio, 27, of SE 1st Avenue, Williston, had attempted to buy cigarettes, the chief said, before grabbing the jar that contained $35.78 from the counter.

  • Williston City Council jumped the gun in April when it made airport committee appointments, but took corrective steps last week to make the wrong right.

    Council Norm Fugate was first to broach the subject weeks ago, when he told the council and city attorney that he thought, according to the city charter, appointments were to be made after the election and the new council was in place.

    The airport committee members were appointed April 5, before the election.

  • Duncan McCollum, who sat on the Levy County Planning and Zoning Board for more than 10 years, died Sunday after a bout with cancer.

    McCallum, 68, was a community-minded individual who worked diligently to enhance the place where he lived.

    In addition to his work with the Planning and Zoning Board, he was also active with his church, First Presbyterian Church in Williston and the Ornan Lodge.

  • Citizens and public officials gave the Levy County Legislative Delegation a long list of work it wants accomplished in the session that starts Jan. 10, 2012.

    Martha Lott, chief judge for the 8th Judicial Circuit which include Levy County, told the legislators on Monday afternoon in a hearing at the county courthouse that a drop in funding has almost forced a shut down — twice. 

  • There was no fanfare and no citizen applause or complaint when the Williston City Council voted Tuesday to set the 2011 millage rate at 5.9025 mills to accompany its $13 million budget.

    In less than 20 minutes, the council adopted the resolutions that will enact the millage rate that determines this year’s tax bill.

    This year’s rollback rate is 6.4246 mills, Stephen Bloom from Severn and Trent told council, and that makes the city’s millage rate 8.13 percent less.