.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

NEWS

  • The Williston City Council gave in to former City Manager Marcus Collins’ demand that he be allowed to collect more than $27,000 in severance pay without signing away his right to sue the city.

    The decision — 3-1 with Councilor Norm Fugate abstaining — came in a special meeting at 10 a.m. Friday at City Hall that was marked by bitter outbursts between council members and the public, and council members and interim City Manager Marisela Barcenas.

  • Williston City Council took more than 90 minutes Tuesday discussing how much, if any, severance pay was due to the former city manager.
    The end result–more than $27,000-but it was a difficult journey getting to the figure.
    Marcus Collins, city manager since January 2009 resigned March 23 and at last week’s meeting council voted to give him a severance package, that included vacation and sick time.

  • The Levy County Commission has decided that the search for new courthouse space will not include the old Bronson High School property at its back door.
    It’s a blow to Clerk of Court Danny Shipp’s plan to purchase and renovate the property. He told the commissioners on Tuesday that members of the county’s courthouse space committee met with representatives of the School Board to negotiate for the purchase of the 20 acres and the buildings — the old school which houses Hilltop School, the gymnasium and portable buildings.

  • Thelma McCain knows how important it is to feel needed, to have a purpose, something to do. Her developmentally disabled son, Harold, 48, has been finding things to do through the Levy Association of Retarded Citizens for 26 years.
    McCain, a Cedar Key resident who volunteers at LARC, said, “At the end of the day, they see something they have accomplished.
    “These people don’t have anywhere else to go. When they are at LARC, they get to do things. They need a life, other than just sitting, watching TV or something.”

  • Levy County is moving into the 21st Century, while returning to its old ways.
    During the formal meeting last week and free-wheeling workshop later, led by Commissioners Ryan Bell of Chiefland (R-District 2) and Marsha Drew of Yankeetown (R-District 3), the commission discussed:

  • It’s not that she doesn’t believe in spanking–because she has spanked her three children in the past, but Williston’s Tenika Jones opposes corporal punishment in schools.
    That opposition is stronger now that her  5-year-old son Jeff (not his real name) was the recipient of a paddling Feb. 1 that, according to her, led to an asthma attack.
    Jones said when she went to meet the school bus that February afternoon, Jeff was crying when he came off the bus.

  • A year of bake sales, yard sales and specialty dinners will come to a close Saturday as fundraisers for the Relay for Life gather at the Williston High School football field to celebrate their hard work.
    Relay, the chief money raiser for the American Cancer Society, also celebrates its 10th year in Williston.
    Cancer survivors will be the guests of honor when the event kicks off at noon and closes early Sunday morning.

  • Edward Fenton, James Blundy and Travis Egyed are charged with grand theft and dealing in stolen property after spending the wee hours Friday morning stripping wire from an irrigation system on a Williston farm, according to a Levy County Sheriff’s Office press release.

  • In a unanimous 4-0 vote Tuesday night, Williston City Council approved a three-month severance package for Marcus Collins, the city manager who resigned March 23.
    Collins, who earned $80,000 annually plus benefits (vacation, sick days, insurance, etc), tendered his resignation March 23 but asked that he not have to fulfill his contract that calls for a 90-day notice.
    “He pulled the city back from almost bankruptcy,” Councilor Michael Shoemaker said. “We owe him a debt of gratitude.”

  • The proposed Tarmac King Road mine project won a recommendation for approval from the Levy County Planning Commission by a 4-1 vote in the wee hours Tuesday and will face a public hearing before the Levy County Commission  at 6:30 p.m. May 3.

  • An Easter Egg Hunt to benefit the Williston Animal Group will be held  Saturday, April 16 from 11 a.m. to noon at Trained Dog Happy Dog, 8575 NW 150th Ave., Morriston.
    Over 100 eggs containing treats and some with special prizes will be hidden. A spoon/egg race with a special “canine twist” will also be featured.
    Please bring your own Easter Basket to participate in the hunt. All dogs must be on a leash and only “dog friendly” dogs please. Monetary donations are welcomed to participate and proceeds will go to WAG.

  • By Ada Lang

  • County Emergency Medical Services may be in need of a rescue.
    Director Trish Seibold submitted her resignation Monday morning to County Coordinator Freddie Moody, just three days after Assistant Director Royce Barber submitted his resignation and left the department.
    On Tuesday the County Commission postponed making a decision on hiring consultants to devise a method of levying EMS assessments for property owners.

  • An avid horse lover for most of her 11 years, Destiny Carreiro dreamed that one day she would get to see a Gypsy Vanner horse in person.
    Her closet at home bears testimony to her love of the equines as a collection of photographs has turned into a collage that pays homage to her equine affection.
    “It was love at first sight,” she said when she first spied the Gypsy Vanner in a magazine. 

  • The Levy County Fair kicks off at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 7 at the Airport Industrial Park.
    A midway, entertainment, livestock and exhibits, including the creative arts will be available for one low admission price of $10.
    Miss Levy County Fair will also be crowned at the close of the Fair, Sunday, April 10.
    Each day is packed with fun, food and entertainment.

  • It was the near the end of the two-hour council meeting Tuesday before the subject was broached.
    As Vice President Debra Jones, acting in the absence of Marc Nussel, asked each councilor for any comments, each praised outgoing manager Marcus Collins and how he had pulled the city from the brink of financial despair.
    And then it was Brooks Holloway’s turn.
    “I want to know when our tally sheets became open records?” He asked interim city attorney Jennifer Ellison.

  • The next  Friends of the Williston Public Library Book Fair will be held Saturday, April 2 from 8:30 a.m. till 1:30 p.m. or as long as there are customers to be served. It will be located in the City Hall Community Center.
    Books are $1, hardbacks; 50 cents soft backs;  25 cents for paperbacks; $1 for tapes and videos;  10cents for magazines and children's books. As always monies collected are used for the benefit of helping keep the Williston Public Library the best in Levy County.

  • By Lou Elliott Jones and Carolyn Ten Broeck

    City Manager Marcus Collins has submitted his resignation and will be leaving in two weeks, according to City Councilman Brooks Holloway and Mayor Gerald Hethcoat.
    Holloway said last week that Collins is taking a $130,000 a year job with an engineering firm.
    “After what has happened here you cannot blame him for taking another job when they are throwing that kind of money at him,” Holloway said Friday.

  • For more than 15 years, Purina HOW® Horse Owner’s Workshops have been held across the nation to educate customers on the very latest in equine health and nutrition.
    This year, Midwest Feed & Farm and Canterbury Showplace, both of Newberry, will host the workshop and provide horse owners the opportunity to meet local equine specialists and learn about the newest developments in equine nutrition, health and maintenance care, veterinary issues, Purina research projects, training techniques and more.