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Editorials

  • Silence is not golden

    When Williston City Council President Marc Nussel announced last week the elimination of public comment at council meetings, we were, at first, alarmed. After all, this country is based on basic freedoms–like speech, assembly, religion and the press.
    But then Nussel clarified, stating that residents can still speak on issues on the agenda, and if the need occurs, they can be placed on an upcoming agenda to have their concerns addressed.

  • Lead by example

    At last week’s Williston Council meeting, Councilor Debra Jones admonished local candidates to adhere to a resolution the council passed in 2003 that called for proper conduct in public settings.
    We agree, but we want to see it taken one step further. We want the council to lead by example and challenge those who come to their meetings to do the same.
    The last several city council meetings have, at times, been chaotic.

  • Take time to be responsible and informed

    Across this country, citizens have proclaimed  loud and clear that they want to be heard–all the way from town hall to the U.S. Capitol. Many feel that personal agendas have gotten in the way of representing the views of the people.
    Residents of Williston have important choices to make March 1 as they head to the polls to elect leaders who will be their voice in city government.

  • Our View

    If  you thought that Mayberry was a meandering dream that lives only on TV Land, guess again. Last Thursday, for the 11th year, the city of Williston paid homage to our military veterans in its annual celebration at the pavilion in Heritage Park.
    Patriotic music, moving speeches and the sight of  our nation’s true heroes sitting in a row moved many to tears in the stirring 90-minute event.
    Rep. Larry Cretul summed it up best when he described the annual event as a picture of Norman Rockwell’s
    America.

  • Kidney disease survivor runs non-profit

    In 1968, at age 2, Lori Hartwell's kidneys became infected. Ten years later, she had to begin regular dialysis treatments in order to live.

    "I vividly remember all of it," said 44-year-old Hartwell in a telephone interview from her home in Glendale, Calif. "Back then (1978), I felt lousy, had high blood pressure, was retaining fluid, and was taking a handful of medication. I was itching a lot because of high phosphorus levels. I was anemic and couldn't walk far."

  • Welcome to our new website

    This past weekend the Williston Pioneer will debut its new website and we hope you’ll take time to look at all the new additions.
    In months ahead, there will be more features, more photographs, more content and new segments that will allow greater reader interaction.
    In addition to news, sports, opinion and features–the articles that are customarily on our website, look for our Pet of the Week segment where you can showcase your favorite pet for the world to see.
    Got something you want to share? We now host reader blogs.