.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Editorials

  • Thinking out loud

    Today–Thursday–is my birthday. For as long as I can remember it’s something I have not looked forward to, mostly because I’ve always lived in colder climates. 

    As a SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) sufferer, the thought of my birthday only exacerbated the seasonal depression I fought. Moving to Florida has helped both–there’s more sunlight here, and instead of the three or four months of doldrums I once had, it’s usually only a couple weeks now.

    But I digress.

  • Back the fight

    The tragedy of breast cancer goes far beyond the thousands of lives it affects and ends every year.
    What makes the diagnosis of the disease especially heartbreaking is the fact that breast cancer is treatable.
    With that in mind, a lot of people are turning to pink to remind everyone that this is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

  • Of course newspapers are Number One

    Newspapers are the number one source of local news. That’s the theme of National Newspaper Week, October 2-8.Well, duh. Of course they are.
    Except for perhaps a few well-known papers that market themselves as national, every newspaper in the land considers local news its bread and butter. Consider all the newspapers in the country. Their combined news staffs dwarf those of any other medium.

  • Harmony doesn’t have to be lip service

    We were the first to say it, and now it seems, some city council members are parroting it–there needs to be some kind of civility among our elected leaders as they tackle the important issues facing Williston.
    At Tuesday night’s meeting, Councilor Brooks Holloway called for harmony to be restored among the council.
    He also wondered what potential businesses would think about Williston if they read about city business in the newspaper.
    We think anyone would infer from news stories, it’s a council divided.

  • Kindergarten basics forgotten at city hall

    It’s been brewing for days, weeks, months–maybe even years, and last Friday the frustration, the disappointment and the anger came to a head at the called Williston City Council meeting.

    Tuesday night, things weren’t much better, even after Council President Marc Nussel called for a return to civility and politeness, while Councilor Brooks Holloway asked for respect–from the council and public alike.

  • Open government is the best government

    There isn’t a government body anywhere that can accommodate  its constituency when it comes time for meetings.
    Unless, of course, meetings are held in the Super Dome.
    That’s why newspapers, the Fourth Estate, are critical to bringing the news to the people who elect government leaders.
    Newspaper reporters are the eyes and ears of Joe the Plumber, who has concerns about what is transpiring in his city, county or state, but yet cannot attend meetings to learn how his tax dollars are being spent.

  • Thanks to those who are sworn to protect and serve

    Bill Cervone summed up the guilt most of us bear–we never think of the police unless we need them, or they are following us down the road with blue lights flashing.
    He also said the usual thanks we bestow on these men and women is when those blue lights go around us to pursue someone else.
    In the precarious time we live in, we must never forget that these men and women put their lives on the line every day–all in the name of serving and protecting us.

  • Red Devils make Willistonians proud

    It didn’t have the ending we’d all hoped for, longed for, prayed for, but nonetheless, the 2010-2011 basketball season was one that excited and entertained fans of Williston High School hoops followers.
    This team, under the leadership of second-year coach Steve Faulkner, showed amazing talent and exceptional sportsmanship.
    It was an amazing season that ended too soon but also holds the promise of things to come next year.
    Congratulations, Williston High School Red Devils. You make your hometown proud.

  • We can't hear you

    If the Williston City Council really wants to have its residents attend, and participate, in its meetings and workshops, it needs to take immediate steps to ensure that people are both comfortable and heard.
    The city council chambers can pack about 70 people in shoulder-to-shoulder–pretty much like economy seats on an airplane. That in itself is uncomfortable, and possibly unhealthy, as germs have nowhere to go in the stagnant air except onto a neighbor.

  • Silence is not golden

    When Williston City Council President Marc Nussel announced last week the elimination of public comment at council meetings, we were, at first, alarmed. After all, this country is based on basic freedoms–like speech, assembly, religion and the press.
    But then Nussel clarified, stating that residents can still speak on issues on the agenda, and if the need occurs, they can be placed on an upcoming agenda to have their concerns addressed.