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Editorials

  • USPS picks winners and losers

    The newspaper business—both small and large papers—has sounded full-throated opposition this past month about a plan by the U.S. Postal Service to purposely entice advertising out of the newspaper so ads can be placed instead with USPS favored stakeholder Valassis Inc., which bought direct mail company ADVO in 2006.

  • Council honors Students of the Month

    At it regular meeting May 8, Williston City Council honored the Students of the Month for May.
    Trey Battle, son of Troy and Dena Battle, was chosen from Joyce Bullock Elementary.

  • Relay a success

    In 2011 more than 1.5 million Americans were diagnosed with some type of cancer and more than half million people lost their lives to the horrific disease. Those staggering figures do not include skin cancers, which do not have to be reported to cancer registries.
    The American Cancer Society–and thousands of people across this county think that’s too many lives lost and each year spends time, sweat and tears organizing its largest fund-raiser, Relay for Life.

  • Don’t mess with tradition

    If we only learned one thing this week it is that Williston residents are passionate about their school, their teams and their mascot.
    When we posted a seemingly innocuous question on Facebook whether it was time the Red Devil mascot be changed, as suggested last week in a letter to the editor, we had no idea the maelstrom it would elicit.
    Now a week later, people are still sounding off and the sentiment is clear–don’t mess with tradition.

  • Thinking out loud

    Today–Thursday–is my birthday. For as long as I can remember it’s something I have not looked forward to, mostly because I’ve always lived in colder climates. 

    As a SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) sufferer, the thought of my birthday only exacerbated the seasonal depression I fought. Moving to Florida has helped both–there’s more sunlight here, and instead of the three or four months of doldrums I once had, it’s usually only a couple weeks now.

    But I digress.

  • Back the fight

    The tragedy of breast cancer goes far beyond the thousands of lives it affects and ends every year.
    What makes the diagnosis of the disease especially heartbreaking is the fact that breast cancer is treatable.
    With that in mind, a lot of people are turning to pink to remind everyone that this is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

  • Of course newspapers are Number One

    Newspapers are the number one source of local news. That’s the theme of National Newspaper Week, October 2-8.Well, duh. Of course they are.
    Except for perhaps a few well-known papers that market themselves as national, every newspaper in the land considers local news its bread and butter. Consider all the newspapers in the country. Their combined news staffs dwarf those of any other medium.

  • Harmony doesn’t have to be lip service

    We were the first to say it, and now it seems, some city council members are parroting it–there needs to be some kind of civility among our elected leaders as they tackle the important issues facing Williston.
    At Tuesday night’s meeting, Councilor Brooks Holloway called for harmony to be restored among the council.
    He also wondered what potential businesses would think about Williston if they read about city business in the newspaper.
    We think anyone would infer from news stories, it’s a council divided.

  • Kindergarten basics forgotten at city hall

    It’s been brewing for days, weeks, months–maybe even years, and last Friday the frustration, the disappointment and the anger came to a head at the called Williston City Council meeting.

    Tuesday night, things weren’t much better, even after Council President Marc Nussel called for a return to civility and politeness, while Councilor Brooks Holloway asked for respect–from the council and public alike.

  • Open government is the best government

    There isn’t a government body anywhere that can accommodate  its constituency when it comes time for meetings.
    Unless, of course, meetings are held in the Super Dome.
    That’s why newspapers, the Fourth Estate, are critical to bringing the news to the people who elect government leaders.
    Newspaper reporters are the eyes and ears of Joe the Plumber, who has concerns about what is transpiring in his city, county or state, but yet cannot attend meetings to learn how his tax dollars are being spent.