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Today's News

  • WES taps first group for ‘Student of the Month’

    Kudos to our first group of students who earned the title, “Student of the Month,” here at Williston Elementary School! “This year we’re recognizing one student per month in each homeroom teacher’s class,” said Marla Hiers, principal. “The teacher can choose which category: citizenship, academics or most improved. We’ve planned to hold this award ceremony the first Friday morning of each month.”

  • Bronson makes new run at flood plan

    The Town of Bronson is taking a new tack in its fight to keep residents from having to buy flood insurance and the Levy County Board of Commissioners is joining the fight.

    FEMA is taking public comment on its proposed maps that put a section of Bronson in a flood plain due to two drainage ditches constructed during the Depression to divert standing waters into Chunky Pond to deter mosquito breeding. As a result, FEMA has determined there is a risk of flooding and homeowners need to purchase flood insurance.

  • ‘PAWS-itively’ powerful

    “Don’t do this!” and “Don’t do that!” all the whole day long. Maybe this was the approach with which many of us were most familiar growing up, but what if someone noticed when we made a good choice, did the right thing? Williston Elementary School’s assistant principal, Angel Thomas, has brought an additional piece to the discipline puzzle we call the Positive Behavior System (PBS).

  • Gainesville ‘Free Friday’ concert
  • Being restless in a strange pew

    The Rev. James L. Snyder  

    Everybody has places where they are the most comfortable. When a person (Yours Truly) is out of their comfortable place there is a certain, what should I say, discomfort. There are two places where I am the most comfortable.

    The first place is behind my computer writing. The second place is behind my pulpit preaching.

  • Log Cabin Quilters

    By WINNELLE HORNE

    Special to the Pioneer

     The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, Sept. 30 at the Levy County Quilt Museum. We have had a busy week. We ended up taking the clothes to Cross City. There is a place there, next door to the Dixie County Advocate, that takes everything.

     We’re about to get everything put back where it belongs. We still have a small leak in the roof but when that is taken care of, we will finish up.

  • County budget approved

    The Levy County Commission has a workable budget on the table, but they are not yet finished with it and the margin for error – handling emergencies — is only $500,000. 

    Deputy Clerk Sheila Rees, who handles county finances, said the budget document drawn up by her, County Coordinator Freddie Moody and Clerk of Courts Danny Shipp uses $4.5 million in reserves to balance the county’s accounts and has only $500,000 to cover emergency expenditures in the $53 million budget.

  • Co-op meet has democratic, game show flavor

    When Central Florida Electric Cooperative holds its annual meeting, it’s nothing like the stuffy affairs held by some corporations, or even the ones that feature a proxy fight.

    The members who own the co-op greet each other as if they are at a family reunion. 

    Whole families come, even bringing babies that are just weeks old. 

    It’s a democratic affair as customers question the management then stick around for a raffle that features cash prizes, gift cards and merchandise.

  • Stitch and Stir HCE meets

    By IRENE GILREATH

    Special to the Pioneer 

    We held the first meeting of our new year on Sept. 8. President Eileen Nuce started the meeting by asking what we did during the summer. Two members had serious health problems; they were President Eileen and Carolyn Agazarm. It was good to know they are doing better now. Elsie Neal has continued to make a good recovery from knee replacement surgery. 

    Some of the members traveled during the summer. Delores Darpino returned from her trip with unusual souvenirs, two adorable kittens.

  • Some of the hardships of hunting

    Gary MILLER

    Outdoor Truths  

    Hunting can be hard. I have witnessed this many times. These last three days were another example. Each day started at four o’clock in the morning and we arrived back home at about ten each night. Most nights we got to bed at about midnight. I’m tired.