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Today's News

  • Downtown Williston suffers: Businesses feeling pinch from recession

    Bonnie Burchett helped one customer all day, and it was already about 2:30 p.m.

    Burchett’s store, Bonnie’s Antiques, is like many other small businesses in downtown Williston. They are struggling to survive in the economic recession.

    “Everybody is fighting to keep alive,” said Irrie Campbell, owner of Come Tan Your Hide, “and especially the small business because we don’t have a whole lot to fall back on.”

  • Bronson mayor ponders defamation suit

    Bronson Mayor Franklin Schuler said he will be filing a defamation lawsuit against the parties to a complaint about his behavior at a concert that resulted in his being reprimanded for a violation of professional standards in his job as a Levy County sheriff’s corrections officer.

  • FOL will celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month with free concert

     On Thursday, Oct. 15, at 7 p.m. the Friends of the Williston Public Library will celebrate “Hispanic Heritage Month.”

    The Latin Band “Troprix” will perform, featuring band leader Gilberto DePaz.

    Originally from Puerto Rico, DePaz has resided in Gainesville for over 30 years. He has been in the music profession for 45 years. He is an accomplished performer and is locally, nationally and internationally popular. The program is free.

  • Disabled? Social Security can help

    Disability is something most people do not like to think about. But the unfortunate reality is this: the chances that you will become disabled are probably far greater than you realize. Studies show that a 20-year-old worker has a three in 10 chance of becoming disabled before reaching retirement age.

  • $60,000 in 60 days

    The School Board of Levy County approved a contract for a math coach consultant on Tuesday night that could total as much as $60,000 for as many as 60 days of coaching.

    The contract will authorize consultant Roberta Dilocker to be a math consultant who will primarily focus on Williston High School for 30 days, and other Levy County schools for an additional 30 days, if approved.

    Williston received an “F” grade last school year, and much of the initial remedy is focused on improving performance in math.

  • A Horse Called Hustle is sweet and witty

    If sex, teasing and innuendo is what you want in a romance novel, then don’t bother with A Horse Called Hustle byee^CJ Love.

    However, if you want a quick-read that’s filled with humor, emotion and saccharine sweetness, be sure to pick it up.

  • Sheriff finds money for cars

    In a reversal of fortune, Levy County Sheriff Johnny Smith told the Levy County Commission that on Monday he discovered he had about $450,000 left in the budget year that ended Wednesday and he spent it on 15 new patrol cars.

    At the same time, he told the commissioners who sat quietly during his announcement, that he will be returning $70,000 they put in next year's budget for repairs to the aging sheriff's patrol fleet and another $40 that was in the budget for repairs.

  • Fall at the Derby promises fun for a good cause

    All the grace, color and tradition that is the Kentucky Derby will move South Oct. 24 when Haven Hospice hosts Fall at the Derby at Black Prong Equestrian Center.

    The 250-acre property, nestled in the heart of the Goethe Forest, will showcase an evening of fun for benefactors of the end-of-life care organization.

    Beginning at 5:30 p.m., guests will be entertained by the Rick Gordon Band, who will play throughout the evening.

    Both live and silent auctions will take place with the center’s Aulson Hall as the focal point for items that have been donated.

  • Williston farmers commit to protecting environment

    A study in 2008 reported agricultural activities as a major source of water contamination, but Williston farmers are working every day to minimize their environmental impact.

    “No one is more cognizant of the need to protect the environment than a man or woman who is absolutely dependent on that environment to make his living,” said Anthony Drew, a county extension agent at the University of Florida. “And a farmer, more than any other industry, is absolutely dependent on a healthy environment.”

  • Now I remember for her

    When I was growing up my mom stayed home. She worked, and worked, and worked. At home. She had 10 children. Twins were born at the end, myself and my sister Wendy. My mom was a master of talking on the phone, cooking, and carrying on multiple conversations with me or one or two of my siblings and looking out for us at the same time.

    Before computers and the internet, she was the original multi-tasker.