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Today's News

  • Ocala soldiers proud to be a part of Williston celebration

    What better portrays the heart of Independence Day than active duty soldiers, dressed in uniform, participating in a parade?

    Last Friday, as people flocked to Williston for the pre-Fourth holiday parade, two soldiers from Ocala were enduring the sweltering heat as they prepared to escort Harley White and Sarah Dykstra in a genuine Army Humvee.

    Laterryio Curington is a 17-year veteran of the Army and is currently stationed in Ocala as the Army recruiter there.

  • Living in the dog days

    Webster defines them as “the period between early July and early September when the hot sultry weather of summer usually occurs in the northern hemisphere.”

    Some rescued dogs find these days to be quite satisfactory, thank you. They are housed in the new Williston Animal Group (WAG) facility adjacent to the airport, on SW 18th Street, and life is pretty good.

    They live in large kennels, comfortable beds, lots of food and water, and are treated to human contact at least twice a day.

  • Barbara Gordon: If you want to be happy, you can

    Barbara Gordon is a woman who knows all about starting over from scratch. In her early 30s when her marriage of 17 years ended, she scraped together $150 to buy an old station wagon, packed up her four children, and left Indiana for North Miami Beach. There the woman who had never before worked outside her home became a merchandiser for Woolworth’s and later K-Mart, while she finished bringing up her children.

  • Believe in Miracles assists women battling cancer

    About eight months ago, 45-year-old Polly “P.J.” Jensen noticed a lump under her left arm.

    She was unable to afford health insurance and ineligible for Medicaid.

    “So I kind of set it aside at the time – something I should have never done,” P.J. said. “Something every women should never do.”

    After a while, the mild discomfort became painful tenderness. “It got to the point that I couldn’t wear anything tight around that area.”

    She finally went to the doctor early this month.

  • Food Pantry feeds the hungry; nourishes the soul

    By 11 a.m. Saturday, the six-foot table was teeming with canned goods and pantry staples as the Youth from Williston First United Methodist Church braved the humidity to collect goods for the food bank that is housed in their church.

    “The need is so big, we are running low,” members said, taking the time to thank shoppers who dropped off one item, or a dozen.

    Five churches support the food pantry and more than 40 families are helped each month with its bounty.

  • WES earns the Silver

    When everyone cooperates and politeness fills the room, the mood is happier and more conducive to learning.

    The students and staff at Williston Elementary School have done such an extraordinary job with the Positive Behavior Support (PBS)ee^program that recently they were honored as a Silver Level Model School for their efforts by the University of South Florida.

    PBS is a system that rewards students for their good behavior.

  • Judge Joe Smith to retire

    Joseph E. Smith, a normally relaxed person, was positively ebullient as he welcomed the visitor to his office.

    The room reflects his persona with Florida State University memorabilia always in view. The judge is known for his devotion to the garnet and gold, so much so a daughter is named Garnet.

    And why not be faithful to the school that launched the love story of his life? Smith met his wife Bobbie when the two attended FSU. They have two children, Garnet and a son, Scott, a Methodist minister, and six grandchildren.

  • Small Town Christmas

    It all began with a birthday.

    A birthday, almost 20 years to the day from this week’s edition.

    The way Lorraine Liebenau remembers it, her husband Fred ventured into a Hallmark card shop Dec. 9, 1989 to pick up a birthday card for his loving wife, and walked out with not only a card but the first of what would become a collection of Christmas village pieces.

  • School District banking on “Race to the Top’

    Finding revenue to keep the school district growing and improving is still first and foremost on Superintendent Bob Hastings’ mind.

    Wednesday, the superintendent addressed about 20 people at the first Superintendent’s Breakfast, sponsored by the Levy School Foundation.

    Hastings is optimistic that the School District, like the nation, will rebound from the recent sour economic downturn, but he doesn’t think it will be this year, or even next.

  • SRLC gets to Round 2 of grant process

    It’s good news for the Suwannee River League of Cities.

    Out of 2,200 applications for federal dollars to fund broadband expansion, the League’s submission was one of 52 to make it to the next tier.

    League members learned last week that their application entered Phase II of the process, making it only one of two in Florida to make the cut.

    Should the League make the next cut, the possibility of money coming to Cedar Key to enhance its communication system is one step closer, said Jeff Hendry, executive director.