Today's News

  • Get ready to Relay

    Williston's annual all-day party got off to a magical kickstart Monday when organizers of Relay for Life gathered at the Heritage Park Pavilion.

    The fundraiser, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, culminates each year with the Relay for Life, scheduled this coming year for April 1 – and that's no joke.

    Missy Maguire, this year's local chairwoman, said the Relay will be from 4 p.m. until midnight at a new venue – Williston Elementary School.

  • Residents balk at noisy peanut dryers

    The noise coming from Williston Peanut's dryers is keeping residents in the area from having the quality of life they deserve, Wayne Williams told Williston City Council Tuesday night.

    Williams, speaking on behalf of more than a dozen residents in attendance, said from August through November the noise is unbearable and prevents residents in the area from entertaining, watching TV or sleeping in comfort.

  • Ride to Provide rolls Saturday

    The Gator Nation may not have a football game to enjoy on Saturday, Oct. 22 but there are at least three events to keep fans in Levy County busy. 

    In the morning the 12th Annual Ride to Provide, a run through the prettiest parts of Levy County, starts registering folks at 7:30 a.m. at the Levy ARC campus in Otter Creek. This is one of two big fundraisers for the center that provides services for developmentally disabled adults. 

    For more information, call 352-219-7806. 

  • Change proposed for CR339, US 27A intersection

    The busy, but tricky intersection of County Road 339 and U.S.Highway 27A – that has seen at least three truck rollover accidents – would be closed and traffic diverted to nearby CR 339A under an idea floated by the Florida Department of Transportation. 

  • Don't be a statistic

     This year more than 246,550 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in American women. That’s 2,000 more cases than in 2013.

    Additionally, 61,000 new cases of carcinoma in situ, a noninvasive cancer that is the earliest form of breast cancer, will be diagnosed.

    More than 40,450 women will die this year from breast cancer, another increase since 2013.

    One out of eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime.

  • Do your part to stop the thief that robs us all

    Breast cancer is a horribly wicked thing. 

    It is a thief. In addition to the horrendous side effects that often accompany treatment, it also strips you of your dignity, your humanity. It robs you of your joy, your livelihood, your relationships. It takes away the ability to connect; it pillages your finances and it destroys who you once were.

    If you don’t believe me, ask anyone who has gone through it. Or anyone who has loved someone who battled it.

  • Real men wear pink

    Members of Williston Fire Rescue Station 72 have picked up the challenge for Pink Heals Cares Enough to Wear Pink during the month of October.

    This year, members are selling t-shirts at the fire department and all money raised from the sales will go to River O’Rourke, the daughter of Robert and Hattie O’Rourke, who live in the Williston area.

  • Just the facts


    • Breast cancer incidence in women has increased from 1 in 20 in 1960 to 1 in 8 today.

    •  For women in the United States, breast cancer death rates are higher than any other cancer, besides lung cancer. 

    •  Besides skin cancer, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women. More than 1 in 4 cancers are breast cancer. 

  • Methods of detection

     By Buster Thompson

    Finding cancer early makes it easier to treat before it spreads. Along with self- or clinical examinations for abnormal tissue, breast cancer can be detected in different ways, known as screening tests.

    Here are some summaries of different screening tests available to detect breast cancer, according to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health:

  • Council starts abatement talks

    Williston residents overwhelmingly voted Aug. 30 for the city to begin a tax abatement program to entice business growth within the city.

    Now, six weeks later, the council is ready to formulate policies and procedures to enact.

    Last week, City Manager Scott Lippmann asked council members for direction on instigating an abatement program.