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Today's News

  • Software will help WPD organize

    Keeping accurate records is vital to every department, but perhaps none so much as Williston Police.

    Last week, Chief Dennis Strow asked for, and received, permission to spend more than $19,000 to acquire new software.

    The package will allow the department to better maintain reports, including incidents, accidents, arrests, investigations, ordinances and activity logs. Software was bought three years ago in anticipation of the Levy County Sheriff going to the same program, but it never happened and the software is less than adequate.

  • Chiefland says county has grudge against it

    The county has a grudge against the City of Chiefland, is what some city officials are saying about Chiefland’s pursuit of emergency services and annual funding from the county for fire protection.

    At Monday night’s city commission meeting, both the issues of ALS and fire funding were discussed during a recap of a meeting last week on ALS between area medical directors, officials from the county and the City of Chiefland.

  • Williston angler competing for $500,000 cash

     The Forrest Wood Cup presented by Walmart, the world championship of bass fishing, will return to Lake Murray and the Columbia, S.C. area Aug. 14-17 to crown bass fishing’s top angler of 2014. Hosted by Capital City/Lake Murray Country Regional Tourism, the tournament will feature 45 of the world’s best bass pros and co-anglers casting for the sport’s biggest awards – $500,000 cash in the pro division and $50,000 cash in the co-angler division.

  • Norm Fugate appointed to Judicial Nominating Committee

    A Williston attorney has been named to a Judicial Nominating Committee by Gov. Rick Scott, who announced six appointments to three such committees last week.

    Norm Fugate, 54, president of Norm D. Fugate, PA, was chosen to serve on the Eighth Circuit Judiciating Nominating Committee. He succeeds Kathryn McLeod Lancaster and was appointed for a term beginning Aug. 4 and ending July 1, 2018.

    Other appointments include:

    • Fifth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission

  • Ground broken for new school

     

    If the walls could talk, they would tell stories of romance, tales of adventure, fears of the unknown, unspeakable sorrows and dreams of the future.

    For more than 80 years, the walls of Williston High School have heard just about everything–most things repeated many times over.

  • Road dedication memorializes Cpl. David Moss

     

    The only Williston police officer to die in the line of duty was forever memorialized last week when a portion of Noble Avenue was named The Cpl. David W. Moss Memorial Highway.

    Moss was 31 when he died July 30, 1988 pursuing a car thief.

  • Candidates meet, greet and answer questions at forum

     

    By Lou Elliott Jones

    If anyone came expecting fireworks at the candidates forum hosted by VFW Post 5625 and the Chiefland Citizen, they were likely to come away disappointed. But hopefully they came away better informed. 

  • Code violators found guilty

    Four Williston property owners learned Monday night that when the city says clean up your property, it means clean up your property.

    In the first meeting in many years to hear code violations, the Board of Adjustment found all four cases presented guilty of violations and issued sentences.

  • Resident blames appointments for committee suspension

    A Williston businessman claims personality clashes are the real reason the city council wants to dissolve the inactive Airport Committee.

    Last week, Dave Bibby, owner of Pyper Kub restaurant near the airport, was the only person who opposed the council’s decision to enact an ordinance to disband the committee.

    The first reading of the ordinance happened last week, following a discussion earlier in July to dissolve the group that hasn’t met in more than 18 months.

  • Williston weighs three options on sinking building

    The building that houses the Williston Fire and Police departments is showing visible unsettling almost daily and now the city has to decide which option to correct it is most viable.

    Last week, City Manager Scott Lippmann said that discussion with the city’s insurer led to three possible solutions.

    The first–and the insurance company’s recommendation–is to fill the low spots with grout.