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Today's News

  • Chiefland commissioners question fire department motives

     

    Some say it started more than a year ago: another heated drama fanned to life at the very home of heated dramas, Chiefland Fire Rescue.

  • The family cookbook holds treasures from the past

     Many people learn to cook by watching and helping a more experienced cook. Today that is enhanced by a myriad of cooking shows–(food even has its own network!), seaching the Internet, buying scores of magazines and occasionally even reading a cookbook.

  • Satire sends Williston viral

    Satire: the use of humor, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people's stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and other topical issues.

     

    Many would agree that there's no such thing as bad publicity.

    Publicity, in any form, gets your name out there and people will talk–and remember.

  • Every vote counts

    It took a couple of hours on Thursday and all day Friday, but by the time the weekend started the Supervisor of Elections was able to announce that former District 4 Commissioner Lilly Rooks had won the Republican nomination by a three-vote margin.

    The final count: 1,728 votes for Rooks to 1,725 votes for incumbent Commissioner Ryan Bell of Chiefland. Rooks will face Democrat Jamie Griffin in the Nov. 4 general election.

    It was a sweet comeback for Rooks, defeating the man who unseated her four years ago, and after suffering two strokes earlier this year.

  • Stories from the river

    As a scientist, Dr. Ken Sulak is trained to make observations.

    He makes his living studying the ways of the natural world, with an emphasis, in recent years, on the lives of sturgeon swimming the lengths of the Suwannee River.

    But his professional work over time has bled into his personal interests: observations on the lives of humans and their place in the world.

    "In the course of being on the river, you run into a lot of people, a lot of old timers," Sulak said from his office at the U.S. Geological Survey last week.

  • Code violators found guilty

    Four Williston property owners learned Monday night that when the city says clean up your property, it means clean up your property.

    In the first meeting in many years to hear code violations, the Board of Adjustment found all four cases presented guilty of violations and issued sentences.

  • Resident blames appointments for committee suspension

    A Williston businessman claims personality clashes are the real reason the city council wants to dissolve the inactive Airport Committee.

    Last week, Dave Bibby, owner of Pyper Kub restaurant near the airport, was the only person who opposed the council’s decision to enact an ordinance to disband the committee.

    The first reading of the ordinance happened last week, following a discussion earlier in July to dissolve the group that hasn’t met in more than 18 months.

  • Williston weighs three options on sinking building

    The building that houses the Williston Fire and Police departments is showing visible unsettling almost daily and now the city has to decide which option to correct it is most viable.

    Last week, City Manager Scott Lippmann said that discussion with the city’s insurer led to three possible solutions.

    The first–and the insurance company’s recommendation–is to fill the low spots with grout.

  • State Winner

    Williston Pioneer editor Carolyn Ten Broeck won two awards in the Florida Press Association's Better Newspaper Contest.

    Ten Broeck earned a first place finish for Best Headline with "The mechanic had hot pink nails" and took second place in General News Story for "Thanksgiving behind bars", the story of the Patas monkey that ran amok in Williston.

    Judges wrote about the first place finish: "Very creative and engaging-it almost has a noir sound to it. Not only is it clever, it captures the essence of the story. Well done!"

  • Incumbents defeated in GOP primary

    By Ashley Thornton

    and Lou Elliott Jones

    If one thing is clear in the results of Tuesday's elections it's that Levy County is divided over the direction it wants to go.

    The results are unofficial but with all 13 precincts reporting, former County Commissioner Lilly Rooks defeated incumbent Commissioner Ryan Bell by five votes in the District 4 race for the Republican nomination and Rock Meeks defeated incumbent Commissioner Chad Johnson by 39 votes to win the Republican nomination for District 2.