.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • County budget over $700K in the hole

    It went almost unnoticed at last week’s Levy County Commission meeting when Sheriff’s Maj. Evan Sullivan said the county budget is running a $732,358 deficit in the first three months of the year.
    Sullivan made the comment while announcing Sheriff Johnny Smith will not charge county and city agencies for dispatch services starting this fall as had been previously announced.
    “We know there’s an issue,” Sullivan said, referring to the money crunch.

  • Morriston author will be at FOL book sale Saturday

     By Drollene Brown
    Special to the Pioneer

    Morriston resident Butch Mayes, author of The Ultimate Metal Detector Book: A Treasure Hunter’s Guide, will appear at the Friends of the Williston Public Library book fair Saturday, April 1. The monthly event is held at the Williston Community Center, next door to Williston City Hall (behind Walgreen's).

  • Judge’s son likely new city attorney

    To judge by the comments after the Williston City Council interviewed three candidates for the City Attorney job Frederick J Koberlein Jr., son of a Dixie County judge, is the preferred choice for the position.
    The council interviewed three candidates on Thursday, March 24, and when they were done, some members were ready to vote on their choice among attorneys Koberlein of Lake City, Heather Christman of Winter Haven, and James T. “Ted” Schatt of Ocala.  

  • LARC lobbies for funding:

    Betty Walker was the last to step on the bus leaving for Tallahassee. The faces of the passengers, clients of the Levy Association for Retarded Citizens, lit up when they saw her short frame come in to view.
    “Does anybody know why we’re going to Tallahassee?” Walker asked.
    “Yeah, for support!” replied a voice from the back. “We don’t want our services cut at all. We want funding.”

  • Levy unemployment drops to 11.4%

    Unemployment in Levy County dropped to 11.4 percent in February, a figure not seen for at least two years.

  • Coyotes on the prowl

    Twenty-five years ago, many Floridians might have thought of coyotes as animals scratching out a living amid the arid landscapes of the Southwestern United States. After all, it was usually a desert mesa that Wily Coyote plummeted from in pursuit of the Roadrunner, not the top of a cabbage palm or granddaddy oak.
    But sometime in the late 1980s, biologists started documenting the movements of coyotes to the southeastern part of the country.

  • Homemakers protest drug testing

    A homemakers group — with most members over age 55 — took the Levy County Commission to task for requiring they provide urine samples for drug tests in order to do volunteer work in the county’s libraries.

  • Sheriff won’t charge for dispatch — this year

    The Levy County Sheriff’s Office has decided not to charge local police and fire agencies for its dispatch services in the coming fiscal year as planned.
    Previously, Sheriff Johnny Smith had told municipal police and fire, and county fire and emergency medical services that their agencies would have to pay as much as $40,000 a year for dispatch services now provided free by his department. The charges were to start Oct. 1 and every agency would be required to purchase a $7,500 software program to become part of the sheriff’s silent dispatch system.

  • All aboard

    Chunky Pond, Levyville, Bronson–no matter what it was called, it was always the centerpiece of Levy County.
    That was but one of the hundreds of historical snippets shared Saturday as Levy County celebrated the 150th anniversary of the Atlantic to the Gulf Railroad that connected Fernadina Beach to Cedar Key.
    The brainchild of David Levy Yulee, Florida senator and the first Jewish member of Congress, the railroad began in 1856 and after several starts-stops, at last reached Cedar Key in 1861.

  • Public hearing slated for April 4 Tarmac mine

    By Mike Wright
    Special to the Pioneer

    Every day thousands of vehicles crawl through downtown Crystal River as they head north or south.
    City officials are cringing at the thought of adding heavy rock trucks to that mix.
    A company’s proposal for a limestone mine just north of Inglis includes promises of up to 250 trucks per day heading south on U.S. 19 through Crystal River — and the same amount returning empty to the quarry.