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Local News

  • Williston not out of Eco Sciences site selection

    Williston City Council members were dismayed last week to learn that Eco Sciences, the company that offered to pay the city for its waste water, was no longer interested in coming to a site at the airport.

    At the city council meeting, Councilor Brooks Holloway told council members that Gary Hammond, Eco Sciences CEO, had decided to move the project to a different city.

    “This costs the city $109,200 a year,” Holloway said, adding the reason was “because of the unprofessionalism of the council.”

  • Kick Start

    A community’s dream is unfolding and last week took a giant leap with some much- needed money.
    Plum Creek, the nation’s largest private landowner, awarded Williston with a check for $10,000 earmarked for a soccer field in Cornelius Williams Park in East Williston.
    Adam Hall, the city’s project manager, instigated the grant application, but gave credit to the city staff, council and the residents who worked together to ensure a dream becomes reality.
    “It was a team effort,” Hall said.

  • Miller sworn in as he, city have meeting of the minds

    Give Pat Miller a good hamburger, some soothing tunes on his stereo and a Robert B. Parker novel, and you make him a happy man.
    Miller, the city of Williston’s newest manager, was sworn in July 13 after he and council came to a happy consensus during his contract negotiations. He began work the next morning.
    With only four days on the job, Miller was running full speed Tuesday afternoon. He’d already met with several staff members, answered a dozen calls and sorted his priority lists into neat piles on his desk.

  • Time more valuable than Big Money

    By MIKE CAPSHAW
    sports@chieflandcitizen.com

    The man known as “Big Money” gave something much more valuable to youth in Williston: His time.
    Gerard Warren, a former Florida Gator and current New England Patriots defensive tackle, donated dozens of hours this summer teaching football fundamentals to about 50 kids at Cornelius Williams Park.

  • Council sets preliminary millage at 5.9025

    You can always go back, but you can’t go up. That was the dominating thought Tuesday night when Williston City Council tentatively set the 2011-2012 millage at 5.9025–the same as it is now.
    There is a caveat to the millage rate, however. Property values in Williston have decreased more than $9 million this year, and if the council opts to stay with 5.9025 mills, it will generate about $57,000 less for the upcoming year.
    The 4-1 vote, with Councilor Norm Fugate opposing, came after two other failed attempts to set a preliminary millage rate.

  • County gets good grade on handling finances from auditor

    Levy County’s outside auditor said the handling of its money is good and gave an unqualified review–the highest opinion possible.
    Alan Nast, of Carr, Riggs and Ingram, LLC, said the audit is “a nice snapshot” of how money is handled by the county. The report is for the county’s fiscal year ending Sept. 30, 2010.
    As for the unqualified opinion, “That’s what you want to hear,” he said.
    But the auditors also noted some items that the county should consider.
    Among other findings in the audit were:

  • Eco Sciences owner unsure of who councilman is

    Gary Hammond, owner of Eco Sciences, did not know which councilman was Brooks Holloway, after Holloway told council members Eco Sciences was not locating in Williston with Hammond citing "because of the unprofessionalism of the council."

  • Businessman refutes councilman's statement
  • Eco Sciences has not ruled Williston out

       Williston City Council members were dismayed Tuesday night to learn that Eco Sciences, the company that offered to pay the city for its waste water, was no longer interested in coming to a site at the airport.

       During councilor discussion, Brooks Holloway told council members that Gary Hammond, Eco Sciences CEO, had decided to move the project to a different city.

       “This costs the city $109,200 a year,” Holloway said, adding the reason was “because of the unprofessionalism of the council.”

  • The ride home

    By Mike Capshaw

    sports@chieflandcitizen.com

    Under a canopy of gray skies Saturday morning, a group of bikers left Williston for Kentucky with the ashes of veteran John Waddy Jr.

    The Patriot Guard Riders were taking Waddy's remains to his family some 600-plus miles away in London, Ky. A dozen bikes headed north to meet another group at the "Flying J at the second exit in Georgia" off Interstate 75. Only one bike, ridden by drive captains Sue Sakers and Mike Engles, will make the entire trek from Florida to Kentucky.