Local News

  • MFA still wants school

    Johnnie Jones admitted to Williston City Council that it was the headline in last week's Williston Pioneer that brought him back before the council.

    Jones, president of the Ministerial Faith Alliance (MFA), a 501 (c)(3), told the council Tuesday that his group is still very much interested in re-purposing the old Williston Middle School, and its only stumbling block is the $2 million price tag the School Board of Levy County attached to it.

  • End of an era as city hall demolition begins

    The trees were among the first things to go, and soon everything else will follow suit.

    Monday demolition began on Williston City Hall and it will continue through the week.

    Utility supervisor CJ Zimoski said the Deodar cedars that graced the city hall lawn will be milled and used as decor in the new building, slated for completion in early autumn.

  • BOCC quizzes FDOT on trouble spots

    By Sean Arnold

    Staff writer

    The Board of Levy County Commissioners argue that the county’s unique traffic patterns might be preventing the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) from properly measuring its worst traffic hazards along state highways.

    At the County Commission meeting Jan. 23, they voiced those concerns to Jeff Scott, the District Safety Program Engineer for the FDOT, who reported on recommendations from safety reviews concerning four potentially problem roadways along state roads in the county.

  • City deals with more miscommunication

    Crystal Pinkston told Williston City Council last week she had paid for a process that she did not receive and she wants to know why.

    Pinkston, who owns Pinkston Investments, rehabilitates vacant and rundown houses to make affordable rental homes within the city, she said.

    Months ago, she made application to de-annex a property on NW 7th Street and was charged $970 by City Manager Scott Lippmann.

  • City mulling gift of old middle school

    It’s been over 18 months since the Ministerial Faith Alliance announced its intent to buy and repurpose the old Williston Middle School.

    And while the MFA has held meetings and garnered community support, the property is still under the ownership of the School Board of Levy County.

    Last week, City Manager Scott Lippmann told the Williston City Council the school board wants to change that.

  • Big step for Williston

    It's been almost four years in the works and last week, work on the veterans' memorial in Williston's Heritage Park inched closer to reality.

    Matthews Granite out of Elberton, Ga., sent its salesman, Jeremy Owens, to town last week to take measurements so fabricating the five granite slabs that will adhere to the concrete form will fit perfectly.

    Owens told Ken Schwiebert that if all goes according to plan, the slabs and the bronze medallions designating the five branches of the Armed Forces will be in Williston and set mid-April.

  • Lamb resigns council post

    The city of Williston will hold a special election in about 60 days to fill the vacancy left by Councilman Kori Lamb's resignation Tuesday night.

    Lamb has sold his Williston home and is moving into the unincorporated area of the county. His term expires in 2019.

  • Two vehicle accident claims life of Morriston woman

    A 21-year-old woman was killed Sunday morning after a two-vehicle accident on U.S. 41 near SE 3rd St.

    Catarina Mayom Raymundo was pronounced dead at the scene after the 2012 Mitsubishi she was a passenger in was struck by a 2000 Ford F350 that allegedly crossed into the northbound lane causing a head-on collision.

  • DOH urges flu shots now

     By Wesley Asbell

    Special to the Pioneer

    In Florida and throughout the United States, flu activity is on the rise. In Levy County, we are currently seeing moderate influenza activity that is actively increasing. There was a sharp increase this past week (Jan. 9-16) among all age groups.

  • Power flickers send consumers to council

    A half dozen or more Williston business owners and residents put the city council on notice Tuesday night that they will hold the council accountable for their electric service – or lack of it.

    Dixie Howell told the council that service has declined over the past several years and not only are the constant outages inconvenient, they are also detrimental to her business, Dixie's Antiques on Noble Avenue. That point was echoed by Katherine Inman, owner of Klover Leaf Tack on 7th Avenue.