.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Hospice names new administrators

    Haven Hospice has named Deborah R. Frederick, who had been serving as administrator of its Gainesville clinical teams, administrator-at-large. Frederick will focus on orienting new administrators, assistant administrators and patient care managers, as well as work on special operational projects. Frederick has extensive experience in hospice management and leadership. “I’m really looking forward to taking our organization to the next level in hospice care,” she said.

  • Veterinarian services can now come right to your door

    There was a time when Charlotte Dow thought she wanted to be an artist, but after moving to Florida from Surrey in the United Kingdom, her love of animals prevailed.

    Thirteen years after skipping across the pond, Dr. Dow is practicing with Drs. Wade Bullock and Kendra Philman at Levy Animal Clinic.

    Dow grew up in Melbourne and attended the University of Florida where she earned her undergraduate degree in animals science.

    Always an animal lover, she chose to attend veterinary school, focusing on food animals.

  • Rotarians sponsor students to learn about other countries

    Most people know that Rotary Clubs are key contributors in their communities but many don’t know they also foster international relationships in their Youth Exchange Program.

    Tuesday, two of those youth told WIlliston Rotary Club members about their summer of awareness thanks to Rotary Club International.

    Caleb Smith of Trenton spent three weeks in Germany this summer with the family of Johannes Schockenhoff.

    His mother, Christine, said she wanted her son to experience Europe as one who lives there rather than as a tourist.

  • James Ivey practicing at Trenton Medical

    Life has almost come full circle for Dr. James Ivey, the newest addition to Trenton Medical Center’s Williston office.

    Ivey, a native of Orlando who spent 22 years practicing medicine, is now seeing patients in Williston.

    A family physician who studied medicine at Atlanta’s Emory University, Ivey said becoming a doctor seemed like a step up from his roots.

    His grandfather was a pharmacist and his father followed him, working in the family drug store.

  • Myatt leads Williston Rehab

    Williston Rehabilitation and Nursing Center announces the appointment of Sue Myatt as its new administrator.

    Myatt has worked in the field of long-term care for 27 years. In addition to a Bachelors of Science degree in Psychology and a Masters of Science degree in Education, she received over 2000 hours of training to become a nursing home administrator in Virginia.

  • HORSEee^CAMPING: Starting a new tourism business

    More than 20 property owners gathered at Black Prong Equestrian Center Tuesday to learn how they might turn their land into a horse camping enterprise. Some people came from as far away as Tallahassee, Chipley, Perry, Miami and Tampa for the all-day class.

    The workshop was co-sponsored by University of Florida IFAS Extension and the Original Florida Tourism Task Force, Natural North Florida.

  • Donor kidneys needed

    As with everything else there are exceptions, but for the most part, the majority of people are good candidates for kidney donation and most can live happy, healthy lives with only one kidney.

    Tuesday, Dr. Michael Casey with the Division of Nephrology, Hypertension and Renal Transplantation at the University of Florida explained to members of the Williston Rotary Club what causes renal failure and how transplants are preferable to a lifetime of dialysis.

  • Rotarians told that we're all responsible for safe water

    Take a gallon of water, remove one tablespoon and you have the representation of potable water worldwide.

    That was the opening analogy Tuesday when Charlie Smith gave a brief presentation to Williston Rotarians on how Rotary is helping preserve and protect water from Africa to Guatemala to Chiefland.

    Smith, a member of both Chiefland and Trenton Rotary Clubs, is also one of the clubs’ spokesman on the Tri-County Springs Promise geared at clean water awareness.

  • Emory Philman wants to rub you the right way

    Emory Philman puts his heart into his work and he has a tattoo to prove it.

    Philman, a massage therapist, is the newest member of Trenton Medical Center’s Williston office.

    A self-described farm boy from Bell, he became interested in massage therapy in 2002 and first learned equine massage at the Reddickee^School.

    Because of his genuine love of people–and the desire to help them feel better–he went to the Florida School of Massage and learned human techniques.

    For the last few years, Philman has alternated between horses and people.

  • Bronson salon cuts through economy to help those in need

    Spiraling downward. Unending. Stripes of red, white and blue.

    Was it really just a spinning barber pole outside a local salon?

    Or, was it a symbol echoing the feelings of so many Americans trying to get ahead, only to find they are getting further behind? Or maybe a helping hand?

    The sign out front, sandwiched between an enormous pair of scissors and a comb, read “The Hair Experts.”